Category Archives: USD

EUR/USD – Echoes of 2002

EUR/USD has bottomed out for the foreseeable future. At the beginning of the year I thought we might have another go at breaching parity on the back of further expectations of Fed tightening spurred by expectations of stimulative fiscal policy (and possibly protectionist measures) from Trump. The downside was nevertheless quite limited because the EUR was starting from very undervalued levels from a long-term perspective. Dips to parity even then looked likely to be a long-term buying opportunity. But with the break above 2015 and 2016 highs seen in July, the base looks to be confirmed technically, and the chances of a dip back below 1.05 – or even 1.10 – now looks like a long shot. The picture now looks quite similar to 2002 when the break through the 2001 and 2000 highs was the start of a 6 year rally of more than 70 figures to the highs in 2008.

Euro bears will be inclined to point out that the EUR was a lot lower then, but in reality the situations are not that different. In 2002 EUR/USD Purchasing Power Parity (according to the OECD) was around 1.17. Now it is 1.33. So, as the chart below shows, the difference from PPP at the lows in 2000 was not that much greater than it was at the lows in January this year. A little over 30 figures then, just under 30 figures this year.

eurusd and ppp

Source:OECD, FX Economics

Then, as now, the rally in EUR/USD frankly looked overdue. The case for the extreme USD strength in the early 2000s was based on a combination of the safe haven status of the USD, the uncertainty about the viability of the newly created EUR and the fallout from the 2000 crash. But by 2002 the major economies were all in the process of recovery and yield spreads, which are usually a reliable determinant for EUR/USD (and its precursor USD/DEM) were suggesting EUR/USD was substantially undervalued. Things are different now in that the yield spread doesn’t show a clear case for a higher EUR (though the US yield advantage is less clear when looked at in real terms).

eurusd and tnotebund

Source: Bloomberg, FX Economics

However, whereas the Euro area then was a region which only had a broadly balanced current account, it now has a massive current account surplus of around 4% of GDP (similar to the US current account deficit at more than $400bn). In the past couple of years this has been more than offset by portfolio and direct investment flows out of the Eurozone, and reports suggest that sovereign wealth funds have substantially reduced EUR weightings since rates turned negative. However, with monetary accommodation now looking more likely to be reduced, and European equities looking considerably cheaper than those in the US, these capital flows may well start to reverse before long.

This doesn’t mean EUR/USD is about to embark on a 70 figure rally over the next 6 years (as it did in 2002) and hit 1.75 in 2023. For the recent recovery to extend much further we are likely to need a significant narrowing in yield spreads, and this may still take some time as the ECB aren’t likely to be in a big hurry to remove accommodation. It is unlikely that the ECB are going to be too concerned about the run up in the EUR seen so far – it is quite minor on a multi-year scale, and the EUR remains quite cheap by long-term standards, but the pace of recovery may be a concern, because that will impinge on inflation in the short run. This could slow any ECB tightening, but the ECB must accept the likelihood of a long run EUR recovery. Nevertheless, EUR/USD should now be seen as a buy on the dip from a long term perspective. 1.10 looks unlikely to be breached again, so anything near 1.15 should be a buying opportunity.

Trump: the new Reagan for the USD?

EUR/USD (equivalent) under Reagan 

eurusd-under-reagan

Source: FRED

Both have been involved in the entertainment industry and both are tax cutting Republicans. Beyond that many Reagan fans would see comparisons with Trump as an insult. But can Trump have a similar influence on the economy and the USD? Reagan’s presidency saw the USD embark on a huge roller coaster rise almost doubling in value against the DEM in 4 years before falling back to its starting level by the end of his presidency. Can the same happen under Trump?

Reagan’s presidency was notable for its big tax cuts, strong growth and roller coaster move in the USD. Trump is also looking at a big tax cut and a big increase in infrastructure spending and they have the potential to mimic the impact of the Reagan years in broad brush terms. While there may be criticism of the efficiency and sustainability of his tax proposals, the markets will initially react more to the brute power of any fiscal expansion. All such efforts have a price and often end with a bad hangover, but by dint of its status as the global reserve currency and the global superpower the US is able to take fiscal actions that might be seen as reckless elsewhere without a major short-term risk.

How big an impact on the economy Trump will have will depend on how much of his proposals he can get through Congress. With a Republican House and Senate he is in a better position than Reagan was, who faced a Democrat House for his whole term, but nevertheless was able to push through some radical tax cuts. I am not going to go into too much economic detail about Trump’s proposed tax cuts and infrastructure spending, in part because his proposals are bound to change, in part because what he gets through may look more like the House Republican package than his current proposals. But it is worth noting that his election proposals involve around $7trn of tax cuts over 10 years and at least $550bn of infrastructure spending. His tax plans will likely be bargained down but even the House plan will involve a corporate tax cut to 20% and personal tax cuts. Some think that the economic impact will be modest, in part because a widening US budget deficit will push up yields and hold back private sector spending.This is possible, though in my view it will take quite a large move up in yields to have this effect, and with yields very low elsewhere rising US yields will make treasuries too attractive internationally for yields to rise too far.The infrastructure spending in any case looks to be the main agenda item for the first 100 days, and this will have a substantial direct growth impact. Tax plans will probably take longer to pass, but should also have a significant impact.

But even if the impact on growth is quite modest because of the impact on yields, the rise in yields will itself be supportive for the USD. We have already seen the start of this. It is here that the comparison with the Reagan presidency looks most apt. Not only are US yields likely to rise in response to more expansive US fiscal policy, the Fed were in any case set to embark on a steady rise in short-term rates. Meanwhile, yields elsewhere have much less potential to rise, with the BoJ locking 10 year yields to zero and the ECB debating an extension of QE rather than tightening. The Euro also looks likely to struggle under the same surge of ant-establishment political uncertainty that has helped to elect Trump, with elections in France and Germany next year and a significant referendum in Italy approaching. While these could also lead to more expansionary fiscal policies in Europe, eventually reducing EUR weakness, in the medium term the political uncertainty looks more likely to weigh on the EUR.

As a reminder of the impact of the Reagan presidency on the USD, the chart above shows the US 10 year yield spread over bunds and EUR/USD (based on USD/DEM). EUR/USD nearly halved from 1.23 in January 1981 to 0.67 in February 1985 when the Plaza accord was initiated to halt the rise of the USD.

There are a lot of questions about timing with Trump policies and the USD. Reagan didn’t really get many of his policies implemented until late 1982 after being inaugurated in January 1981, and the chart suggests this was the second leg up in yields after the first had been triggered by the policies of Volcker at the Fed. However, the USD started to rise almost from the moment Reagan was elected. Of course, some of this was down to Volcker rather than Reagan, who had come in under Carter and had raised rates sharply to bring down inflation. But anticipation of Reagan’s policies played its part. In the case of Trump, he may well get things through faster than Reagan, and with the Fed already primed to hike the USD seems likely to react immediately. It has already started.

In addition to the potential impact of fiscal policy on growth and yields, the Trump presidency offers the possibility of new Fed appointees favourable to his more hawkish preferences for monetary policy, and the intended corporate tax cuts could also lead to huge repatriation of funds held abroad by US corporations, both of which could exacerbate the USD boost.

Of course, there are aspects of the Trump presidency that may not be seen as being so USD positive. Severe restrictions on immigration could be expected to have a negative impact on growth, as would major changes in trade agreements. But it remains to be seen whether these “populist” policies will be implemented aggressively. While in theory the President can make changes to trade agreements much more easily than he can to spending decisions, Trump’s election promises may turn out to be negotiating positions. His post-election statements suggests some backtracking, but even if they don’t restriction of labour supply and restriction of imports could result in significant inflation and higher yields, possibly even boosting the USD further.

Of course, none of this represents an opinion as to whether Trump’s policies are good for the US or the world. The strength of the USD is not a barometer of good or bad policy. It’s a price, and right now it looks like it’s going up.

 

 

Supertanker turns?

EUR/USD is a supertanker. It takes a lot to turn it, and yesterday’s break higher was long overdue, as the European data had been steady and the US data deteriorating for some time with little impact on the currency. Whether this is a proper long term turn depends on how much trust we can place in the evidence of weak US and more solid Eurozone data and whether we believe that Draghi has more ammunition to halt the EUR recovery. I suspect we aren’t quite ready to believe that the US recovery is burned out so long term EUR/USD gains will have to wait. But even if the supertanker hasn’t made a longer term turn, it doesn’t reverse these sort of moves quickly. While rapid moves of this sort are often corrected for a period before extending, I would still be looking to buy a big enough dip. Technically, we have now achieved the 61.8% retrace of the 1.1495 to 1.0525 October to December decline, so I wouldn’t be chasing it as we may well see some retrace, but I think it will take real news, and not just a decent employment report tomorrow, to get us back below 1.10 with major supports now at 1.0980 and 1.0940. People may start to remember that employment data often lags the cycle.

For what it’s worth, I doubt that he US economy is really weakening dramatically. The data is unreliable in the short run and the short term impact of a weaker oil price may have been negative, but longer term effects are more likely to be positive. I wouldn’t rule out a rate hike this year, despite the latest market moves, though again, we need to see some numbers to get the market thinking that way again, and they aren’t going to turn up immediately.

Of course, Draghi won’t be happy to see EUR/USD spiking higher, and its rise will give him some ammunition to persuade the ECB Council that more easing is required. If he gets the desired further ease, EUR/USD will settle into a range again. I’m not sure he will but the market is probably going to bet on it ahead of the March meeting, so I think other currencies where easing is less likely are more attractive USD alternatives. The JPY is one possibility, and the easing has already been done so another move near term is unlikely, but you have to back weak equities to favour major yen strength. It’s quite possible, but I’m not quite ready to do that as even though the US data has been disappointing, equities get the comfort of lower yields, and European data has been less of a concern. I’m keener on the AUD, which looks ripe for a recovery if commodities stabilise, and the SEK, where the Riksbank’s threats look empty with EUR/SEK pushing 9.40 and growth remains the strongest in the developed world.