Category Archives: GBP

GBPSEK selling opportunity

The Turkish crisis and Brexit muddle create an opportunity to sell GBP/SEK

 

Turkish crisis dominates the action

This month global markets are mostly concerned with Turkey, with the sharp fall in the currency the main driver of concerns about deteriorating credit quality due to large net external liabilities. The degree to which foreign currency debt of Turkish entities is currency hedged is unclear, but is key for determining their solvency. Other than the weakness of the currency, the economic situation is in any case vulnerable, but has been for some time. But from a baseline of vulnerable, conditions have deteriorated steadily in the last year or two, with inflation rising and the current account deficit widening, in part because the central bank has not been allowed to make the rate rises required to stem these trends. This political aspect of the problem makes it much more intractable, especially when you throw in the pastor and the aggressive tariff response from Trump.

It is hard to see the endgame at this stage. Funding the current account deficit will remain very difficult as long as there is no action. Even significant interest rate rises may not help much at this stage. Capital controls may come in, and there are risks of default on external debt. However, most of the risk is not government debt, as in previous crises, but corporate debt. This makes a bailout unlikely and difficult, but also probably reduces contagion risks. While there is significant exposure to Turkish debt among European banks, it is not game changing – even the most exposed banks would survive the worst case scenario as long as the problems remain isolated to Turkey.

Which leads to the main question, which is one of contagion. Most commentators argue that this is the primary risk, citing parallels with previous EM crises, notably Asia 97. And they are right, because markets are never entirely predictable, and if appetite for risk disappears what currently appears a perfectly solid investment can quickly become vulnerable. (Almost) everyone needs to raise money, and in such circumstances even perfectly solvent entities can struggle to refinance if markets suddenly become unprepared to fund. As Hamlet says “there is nothing good or bad but thinking makes it so”, and shocks like Turkey can lead to some pretty muddled thinking.

Nevertheless, we doubt that the Turkish situation will lead to a big global meltdown in EM, or a renewal of the Eurozone crisis. Even worst case scenarios should remain contained.  While we may have a period of pressure on some EM currencies and higher EM yields, in the end the global economy is starting from a position of reasonable health driven by good US growth and improving Eurozone growth, combined with a generally more solid global banking system. There are savings looking to be deployed towards higher yielding assets in a world of still very low yields. There are no certainties, but this episode looks likely to present an opportunity to buy risky assets. Of course, care is required, as especially in August things can go a lot further than we would expect before turning. Things that look cheap may yet get a lot cheaper, so technical signals that the market has completed its rout need to be awaited.

Opportunities created by Turkish crisis

The obvious opportunities are the emerging markets that have suffered in sympathy with the Turkish Lira. The ZAR, BRL, and even MXN have all weakened, and there may well be value there. But getting these right requires good timing and a clarity that the crisis is over. In these situations it is often better from a risk/reward standpoint to consider the less obvious collateral damage. In the G10 space the two currencies that have suffered the most since early August are the NZD and SEK. The NZD is understandable as it can be considered the closest thing to an emerging market in the G10 space. But the SEK? Sweden has a current account surplus, very low interest rates and inflation, the strongest growth in Europe and a very secure budget and banking system. It is no-one’s idea of an emerging market. Nevertheless, the SEK does tend to exhibit characteristics of a risk positive currency. This is in part a historic issue harking back to the days when Ericsson made up 30% of the value of the Swedish equity market and it was strongly identified with the tech boom and bubble. But nowadays, while still showing one of the strongest growth rates in the EU, there is no particular dependence on tech. Both EUR/SEK and USD/SEK have risen to levels that have to be considered excellent longer term value regardless of which way the Turkish crisis is resolved, but GBP/SEK may represent the best trade, given the risks involved in the run up to the Conservative Party conference and the October EU Summit.

With the UK parliament on holiday, there have been no significant developments in the last couple of weeks, but there has been more and more noise suggesting that the risk of a “no deal” Brexit is increasing. The main upcoming events are the UK Conservative Party conference from September 30 to October 3 and the EU Summit on October 18/19. Neither looks likely to provide any real progress on Brexit, and the prospect of “no deal” will consequently become even more probable, at least as far markets are concerned.

There are several reasons for the lack of progress, but the two main ones are the lack of any majority in the UK parliament for ANY Brexit plan, and the perception on both sides that the threat of “no deal” – and the brinkmanship involved in that – is necessary in order to get the “best” deal for their side. It may be that an apparent increase in the probability of “no deal” is actually a necessary condition for a deal to be done, but the process will nevertheless have continued market impact.

For what it’s worth, we believe that a free trade deal of some sort is the most likely eventual outcome in the Brexit process. Probably the best reason for this is Ireland. “No deal” would require a hard border, and that is anathema to both sides as well as effectively contravening the Good Friday agreement. But even though a free trade deal is likely eventually, that doesn’t matter right now because it isn’t the most likely next step. More stress is required to produce that outcome.

From a trading perspective, the battleground is GBP. We look to play this from the short side not only because the next events look likely to be GBP negative, but because GBP is starting from a position which we regard as barely below fair value. The current price does not adequately reflect the risks of Brexit.

GBP/SEK looks an attractive vehicle to express GBP weakness here.

GBPJPY hitting selling area

Forget about Brexit for the moment. We don’t know what it will look like, when it will happen or what the global story will be when it does happen. Let’s just look at where the currencies and economies are now, and ask if that position makes sense. In the case of GBPJPY, it doesn’t.

The market is being asked to finance an annual  relative current account position between the UK and Japan of more than $300bn in Japan’s favour, but is being offered no real yield advantage to do so, and GBP/JPY is already relatively expensive relative to PPP and to history. So even without worrying about Brexit, it’s pretty hard to make a case for GBPJPY to be at current levels.

GBPJPY is currently trading around 152. Is that high or low? Well, if you just look at a normal chart, you might think it’s low, because GBPJPY has been falling for the past – well – forever. Even in the past 20 years it has round about halved in value. Though it is around 30 figures above its all-time low (see chart below).

gbpjpy

But this is entirely a nominal picture that ignores inflation. Most of the reason for GBP/JPY’s decline in recent years has been the higher inflation in the UK relative to Japan. The easiest way to illustrate this is to look at GBP/JPY relative to GBP/JPY PPP, as shown in the chart below.

 

gbpjpy and ppp

Source: OECD, FX Economics

So although GBP/JPY has been falling steadily, it is now trading above PPP, and is further above PPP than its average over the last 20 years, as shown in the chart below.

gbpjpyppp

Source: OECD, FX Economics

So, in real terms GBPJPY actually looks quite high compared to history.

Is this justified? Looking at the data, the simple answer is no. UK real yields are not relatively attractive. At the 10 year tenor, the nominal spread is 1.2% in favour of the UK. But the inflation differential in 2017 was 2.6%. Even though this is expected to narrow in 2018, it is still expected to be 1.6% according to OECD forecasts. So real yields actually favour Japan and the JPY (even more so at the short end of the curve where nominal spreads are smaller).

What about other determinants of cross border flows? The current account position implies a need for a cross border flow, and the UK was in deficit in 2017 to the tune of about 4.7% of GDP, while Japan was in surplus by 3.9% of GDP. This difference is only expected to narrow very marginally in 2018.

So the market is being asked to finance a relative current account position of more than $300bn, but is being offered no real yield advantage to do so, and the currency is already relatively expensive to PPP and to history. So even without worrying about Brexit, it’s pretty hard to make a case for GBPJPY to be at current levels.

If we add Brexit into the mix, it’s worth noting that GBPJPY is now above the high it traded the week before the Brexit referendum. Whatever you think about Brexit, it is pretty hard to argue that it currently justifies a stronger currency.

So much for valuation. But a large part of this story is about the weakness of the yen rather than the strength of sterling, and the weakness of the yen has historically been well correlated with positive risk appetite, reflecting the historic tendency for the surplus country to be keener to place money abroad at times of positive risk sentiment. But this makes far less sense than it used to when the real yields available outside Japan are no greater than the yields available inside Japan.

So it seems to me that these represent excellent levels to sell GBPJPY for the medium to long term. For the technical minded. 153.80 represents the 76.4% retracement of the move from the 164 May 2016 high to the 123 October 16 low.

Rate hike won’t sustain GBP strength

I’ll make this short because I’ve covered this ground in this blog before, but recent gains in GBP in response to the latest inflation data and the more hawkish tone from the Bank of England at the September meeting make it worthwhile to go over it once again.

First, the basics. Higher inflation, other things equal, should mean a currency goes down, not up, in order to maintain the relative price level. The fact that currencies tend to rise in the short run with upside surprises in inflation is an anomaly seemingly based on a combination of money illusion and a historic expectation that higher inflation will trigger a response from the central bank that will actually mean higher real interest rates. This seems to be a distant memory of the 1970s and 80s, because it is hard to find occasions in the more recent past where higher inflation has triggered higher real rates (as opposed to just higher nominal rates) in the major economies. Of course, real rates have been falling steadily for years as a result of structural as opposed to cyclical factors, but even the cyclical upturns have seen precious little rise in real rates (see the FX market needs to rethink inflation, November 18 2016).

All this is relevant to the recent reaction to UK news. Inflation is above target and still rising, mainly in response to the decline in GBP seen after the Brexit vote. The MPC is now considering a rate rise in response. But the rate rise will come nowhere near full compensation for the rise in inflation seen since the Brexit vote. Real rates have fallen, and even if we see a 0.25% rise in the base rate soon they will still be well below where they were not just before the Brexit vote, but immediately after the BoE cut in rates after the vote (see chart below). While inflation has also risen elsewhere, it has not moved as much, and UK real rates remain unattractive, and will remain unattractive even if they move modestly higher.

Real UK base rate

uk real rates

Source: Bank of England

On top of this, there is the question of whether higher real rates in these circumstances, if they were to come, should be seen as positive for GBP. In general, higher real rates are theoretically positive for a currency, but in the current UK situation Carney’s speech yesterday makes it clear that his case for higher rates is based primarily on the expected inflationary consequences of Brexit. This is not the usual cyclical impact of rising demand, but a structural change that will reduce both demand and supply and raise prices, at least in the short run, with Brexit effectively acting as a de-globalisation. Carney’s case for higher real rates essentially rests on the belief that the Brexit impact on supply will be greater than the impact on demand. This is debatable (as he himself admits) and it is hard to instinctively see this as positive for GBP, because real rates will be rising because of reduced potential output due to reduced efficiency and lower productivity. Any benefit from higher portfolio inflows to seek out the higher real rates seems likely to be offset by reduced inward direct investment as a result.

In summary, the case for GBP gains based on a more hawkish BoE seems very weak. Any rise in nominal rates looks unlikely to translate into a rise in real rates, and to the extent that real rates are higher than they would have been, it will likely only reflect the Bank’s concern that Brexit is going to undermine potential UK output growth by reducing productivity and undermining existing supply chains. Of course, that doesn’t mean GBP will reverse recent gains quickly (the market can remain irrational longer than you can remain solvent), but looking at the charts suggests to me that 1.38 would be a very good area to sell GBP/USD, while anything below 0.87 looks a buying area for EUR/GBP.

The UK needs a weak pound

UK Chancellor Philip Hammond welcomed the rise in the pound that accompanied the announcement of the UK election last month. He should be careful about cheerleading GBP strength, because right now the UK is more in need of a weak pound than it has been for a long time, and a significant recovery in GBP could be a big problem for the UK economy.

The UK economic situation is dangerous, not only because of Brexit, but because of the perilous position of the UK’s consumer finances. This is well illustrated by the chart below showing the financial balances of the three sectors of the UK economy, balanced by the position with the rest of the world.

sector balances

Source: ONS

The UK household deficit is at record levels, and as can be seen from the chart, the existence of a deficit is a rarity, seen only briefly in the late 80s and then for a few years in the mid 2000s. It is a danger signal. In both cases, the deficit was followed by a recession, as consumers retrenched, as can be seen from the chart below.

householdbalance and GDP

Source: ONS

The process see in the past is instructive. Most of the time, GDP grows as the household balance moves towards deficit, fuelled by deficit spending. However, when the household balance moves into deficit, it tends to reverse, and this has historically led to a recession. If this is not to happen this time around, the inevitable reversal in the household balance must be accomplished slowly while other sectors are adding to growth. With the government constrained by longer term budget issues, this really only leaves investment and net exports. This makes the danger from Brexit fairly obvious. If firms are worried about access to the single market then investment in the UK may be curtailed. Longer term, the terms of Brexit will be key for net exports, but shorter term, the export sector looks likely to be the healthiest, as UK exporters benefit from the combination of a lower pound and strengthening Eurozone domestic demand. But this is why a significant recovery in the pound is not desirable. It would both undermine export growth and discourage investment.

Is a recession inevitable when households retrench? Not necessarily – it will depend on the conditions. In 2000 when the dotcom bubble burst the UK avoided recession in spite of a very extended household sector which did retrench, because rate cuts encouraged firms to borrow. But this underlines how important business confidence is in the current UK cyclical situation. With no rate cuts available to encourage businesses or households to spend, confidence in the future is key if spending is to be maintained.

All this makes the timing of Brexit look extremely inopportune. In the mid 2000s, the household sector ran a financial deficit for a few years before the crash, but the crash was all the more severe when it came for that reason. If growth is maintained in the coming years ahead of Brexit, the situation will be similar when Brexit actually happens. If Brexit hurts exports and investment, there will be no safety net.

Policywise, this should make it clear to the government that “no deal” with the EU is not an option. The fear is that they will  believe their own publicity and see limited economic damage if they fail to get a deal. Or take the view that, politically at least, falling back on the WTO will be favourable to accepting a deal that is like EU membership only worse. Hopefully sense prevails.

But in the meantime, the UK economy needs to be managed into a position where it can deal with a potential shock. This means managing a retrenchment of household finances now – while exports are strong enough to offset the negative growth impact. Unfortunately, it is hard to think of a policy mix that will achieve the desired outcome of slower consumer spending with strong exports and investment. Higher rates would help increase saving, but would also likely undesirably boost the pound. Higher taxes wouldn’t reduce the household deficit, only consumer spending, but would give the government more scope to react to shocks in the future, so are probably desirable. Direct restrictions on consumer borrowing might also make sense. But a stronger pound would not be helpful. Hammond should not be talking it up.

UK retail sales – the beginning of a slump?

Unusually I think it’s worth highlighting a monthly release. There is a lot of randomness in most monthly data and UK retail sales is one of the most vulnerable to monthly glitches, often because of seasonality problems. However, if you look at a 3 month average of sales the trend has been quite clear in recent years, until the last couple of months where it looks like everything fell off a cliff.

uk retail

Source: ONS, FX Economics

Now, it’s as well to be cautious in interpreting such sharp moves in retail sales, especially around the turn of the year when Christmas effects can be unpredictable. The plunge we have seen is really based on just a couple of months data. But as can be seen from the series, it is rare for the 3m/3m trend to move so sharply. If we see a similar story in March it would be fair to conclude that there has been a clear weakening in the trend.

Which leads me to the March data due for release tomorrow, Friday April 21. Looking at the screens today, the market median expectation for retail sales is for a m/m decline of 0.2% in the headline number, and a 0.4% decline in the core. Now, this seems to me to be quite a pessimistic forecast. The impact on the 3m/3m growth rate would be minimal, as shown below.

UK retail march

Source: ONS, FX Economics

Retail sales only makes up around 40% of personal consumption, but even so, a 1.2% decline in a quarter is quite a serious slump. Even if we assume the rest of spending carried on as before at the 0.7% q/q rate seen in Q4, then this would still mean negative consumer spending growth in Q1. As I was last month, I am a little sceptical that spending has been quite that weak. Last month we got a rise of 1.4% m/m, which was still far too little to prevent a sharp weakening in the 3m/3m trend, but was nevertheless well above the monthly forecasts. Markets saw this as good news, simply because the outcome was better than expected on the month, but it’s very hard to see how this sharp weakening in the retail sales trend is actually positive news for GBP. This month we may get more of the same. It would take something above a 3% m/m gain to prevent retail sales falling q/q in Q1. But a better than expected outcome of a 1% rise or so seems quite likely, as this would still mean a fall of 0.75% q/q. But surveys don’t suggest any major recovery, with the BRC survey showing the weakest quarter since May 2011 for non-food sales.

So we might get a knee jerk positive reaction because the monthly forecasts once again look quite weak and the m/m rise may be better than forecast. But any positive GBP reaction could prove a selling opportunity for GBP as the strength of the UK economy that Theresa May and the IMF have been telling us about in the last week looks to have come to something of a shuddering halt in Q1. Who knows, this may be another reason that May has called an election now. There are initial signs of a slowdown, and she may want to get an election in now in case they become more obvious in the coming months and years. We are in the sweet spot when it seems consumer confidence is still high, or at least was until Q1, exports are getting some support from a weak pound and there are as yet no negative consequences of Brexit to deal with. Things might not look so rosy in a few months.

UK election – GBP surge may last a while but…

maycorbyn

So May calls and election, saying she’s fed up with having opposition from the – er – opposition, and also from the Lords. Someone should tell her an election isn’t going to have much impact on the unelected House of Lords, but it’s true it may have the desired effect on the House of Commons. In practice, she is likely to increase her majority because even though she may lose a fair few seats in the South to the Lib Dems campaigning on a Remain ticket, she looks like picking up a lot of Labour seats in the North, and also gaining votes from UKIP now the Tories have become the party of Brexit.

What I find depressing is the process of British politics. I suppose it is no surprise that politicians are power hungry – it is in their nature – and they will grab as much as they can given the chance. That is probably true pretty much everywhere, but let’s not pretend there is any higher motive for the election than that. But it is particularly depressing in the UK, where the first past the post system means the governing Tory Party already has a degree of power that is unrivalled is the vast majority of western democracies which generally have some form of proportional representation. The desire for an even bigger majority than the 17 the Tories currently have, so that there is no effective opposition at all (even within the Tory Party) is, in my view, faintly obscene, but that’s (British) politics. What is mystifying is why Corbyn and the Labour Party seem so happy to accede to her wishes. Sure, he was calling for an election after the referendum, but she refused. Now he should refuse. That’s the point of the Fixed Term Parliament Act. The timing of the election should not be based on the whim of the governing party (or any other party). His agreement to an election just underlines that Corbyn is a political idiot.

Anyway, it looks like May will get her wish and get an election and a bigger majority. The market consensus is that this is a good thing in practice, because it will give her more negotiating power at the Brexit table. This is true, in that there will be no election looming over her as the end of negotiations approach. However, the idea that she will take a more moderate and compromise friendly approach because she will be less dependent on her right wing looks a little speculative to me. It’s possible, but I don’t detect an air of compromise in her recent statements. I think it’s just as likely that the elimination of an effective opposition will allow the government to take a much more hard line approach. The security of the Conservative political situation domestically will allow them to indulge prejudices that are not necessarily optimal for the long term health of the economy.

While she will of course say she wants the best deal for Britain, what does that actually mean in practice? No-one really knows what the best deal is. Although the vast majority of economists believe something as close as possible to Remaining would be best economically, it is clearly not just about economics. In fact, it is probably not about economics at all. For politicians, the best deal is the deal that will given them the best chance of winning the next election with the biggest majority. The economic impact of Brexit may be large or may be small, but it will not be easily observable because there is no counterfactual. We won’t know what a good Brexit looks like any more than what a bad one looks like. We won’t know if Remaining would have been better. Even if the next election isn’t until 2022, the economic impact very likely won’t be clear by then.

But some things will be easier to measure. The level of immigration for instance. If the government manage to restrict immigration significantly they will probably benefit in the polls (regardless of whether that is actually beneficial). If they win the June election with an increased majority it seems likely to send them a signal to continue to work the nationalistic angle. This is not a conviction government. May has U-turned on Brexit and U-turned on an election. She will go with what works, and if she can sell an image of the UK battling for independence from a sclerotic Europe she will do it. I could easily be wrong here, but markets must beware of believing politicians are thinking about the economy. They are thinking about politics, and right now the economics isn’t clear enough (at least to the layman voter) for that to be the main factor.

As far as FX is concerned, for now at least, there’s no point bucking the market consensus. GBP is benefiting from the more positive view of Brexit, helped in large part by the heavy short positioning that has been evident for some months in the futures data. Some of that has now been eliminated, but the wind is still with the pound. I stick with the view that there isn’t much long term value in the pound here, but there may still be some more upside in the short term. In the absence of news from the US on tax reform the USD looks to be on the back foot for the moment, with expectations of Fed hikes fading, and we are likely to see GBP/USD gains beyond 1.30.  The EUR’s near term chances depend largely on the French election. If Macron gets to the second round he should win and the EUR should benefit modestly from this, but will suffer sharply if the run off is between Melenchon and Le Pen. On the positive EUR outcome I would see EUR/GBP as a buy below 0.83.

Looking a little further forward, the election may not be quite as smooth a victory as the polls currently suggest, and the current perception of the strength of the UK economy seems to be lagging behind what looks like a fairly sharp consumer slowdown in Q1. I would still be looking to sell GBP post election, or possibly before if the current euphoria dies down or we have some positive developments for the EUR or the USD.

 

GBP isn’t cheap

Over the last few weeks and months I’ve noticed quite a few commentators suggesting that GBP might now be attractive because it is very cheap. For instance “the pound looks increasingly “cheap” in a historical context” (Morgan Stanley March 7). “The pound looks cheap at current levels” (ANZ December 6). “The pound is looking “cheap” from a longer-term point of view” (Scotia Bank March 2). There are plenty of others. The consensus seems to be that the pound is cheap because it is suffering from Brexit woes, and that if those were to fade, or be overtaken by concerns elsewhere in the world, the pound would recover. But I would argue that although the pound is obviously cheaper than it was, it still isn’t really cheap against most of the other major currencies.

If something falls a lot it doesn’t necessarily mean it is now cheap. It’s possible of course. But it is also possible that it is falling in line with long-term equilibrium – i.e. it is no cheaper than it was. Or, more likely, it could be that it has fallen from expensive levels and is now just less expensive, or fair. How to decide? Well, some sort of sensible model of fair value is necessary, otherwise we don’t know where we are starting from, or what affects long term equilibrium.

A lot of people run a mile as soon as they see the word “model”. Models are distrusted. So I’m not going to create anything complicated or use any fancy econometrics. I’m simply going to point out three things.

  1. It is the real value of a currency that matters, not the nominal value. This is just another way of saying that if prices rise in one country or currency area relative to others, then unless the currency falls, things are now more expensive in that country/currency area. In other words, to keep the real value of the currency stable, currencies have to fall if relative inflation is high in their area.
  2. Trade balances and current accounts matter. The bigger your current account deficit the more capital you need to attract to finance it and, other things equal, the lower your currency has to be.
  3. Interest rates make a difference. If you have higher interest rates than others there will be more demand for assets denominated in your currency. This ought to apply to real interest rates (interest rates minus expected inflation) rather than nominal rates, because future inflation would typically lead to currency depreciation (point 1).

I don’t think anyone would argue with these three points. But if these are accepted, I don’t see why people see GBP as cheap.

Point 1 is really the most crucial. While terms of trade and interest rates are clearly important, the impact from changes in export and import prices can take some time to be felt and can be offset by other flows. Similarly, interest rate variations affect short-term demand, but if such variations are cyclical they may not have much impact on long-term value. But where we are starting from in terms of the real value of the currency is critical.

So where does the pound stand in real terms? There is more than one way to measure this, but I will use two main methods. First, let’s looks at the commonly used measure of the real effective exchange rate. The chart below shows the narrow real effective GBP exchange rate, and on the face of it, GBP does look quite weak by historic standards. But looking at it next to the EUR effective exchange rate, it isn’t so clear. Since the financial crisis the EUR has weakened more on a trade weighted basis than GBP. Even more dramatically, the USD is well above the highs seen in the last 20 years

realeffective

Source: BIS

So what’s going on? Well, a little more light is shed if we look at another measure of value – namely GBP versus purchasing power parity (PPP). Below is a chart of EUR/GBP against EUR/GBP PPP.

eurgbp ppp

As this shows, EUR/GBP remains some way below PPP. This is not unusual – it has only briefly traded above PPP in the past. This is itself a little puzzling, and I would argue that it is hard to justify, of which more later. But even taking that as given, EUR/GBP is only marginally stronger relative to PPP than its average in the last 20 years.

So GBP isn’t really weak against the EUR at all. What we are seeing here is not GBP weakness, but USD strength.

This is all the more obvious if you look at GBP/USD relative to PPP, shown below.

gbpusdppp.png

The USD is as strong against the pound (relative to PPP) as it has been since the 80s and the Reagan era. But the USD is strong against (almost) everything. Only the CHF among the majors looks stronger relative to long run fair value.

Now, USD strength is based on the cyclical strength of the US economy, and to that extent is justified in the short to medium term because US interest rates are higher than the UK and Eurozone, and rising. While the UK economy is (arguably) similarly strong to the US, given low levels of UK unemployment, the UK doesn’t have the interest rate advantage. Indeed, real UK rates are the lowest in the G10. Not only that, but the UK also has a massive trade and current account deficit. The chart below illustrates the situation.

yieldcascatter

Source: OECD. Real rates based on 2018 forecasts of PCE deflator

The further north-east you can get in this diagram, the more attractive your currency should be. A big current account surplus, like Switzerland, will normally allow you to have low real rates while high real rates, like New Zealand, will normally allow you to run a big current account deficit. The UK is currently enjoying the worst of both worlds. It’s also noticeable that real rates in the US aren’t all that attractive, and may not be high enough to justify the very high level of the USD. As far as the EUR is concerned, there are clearly other issues at play, including existential concerns. But without even considering the potential future negative impact of Brexit (though of course some of this is included in the real yield), it would make sense for GBP to be well below fair value. The fact that it still trades well above PPP against the EUR, and close to it against the USD, suggests it is far from cheap.

Policy mistakes should not always be reversed

cpimktfeb17-1

UK inflation is rising

The Bank of England cut rates by 25bp and increased asset purchases in August in anticipation of a loss of confidence after the Brexit vote on June 24. The objective was stated to be to “provide additional support to growth and to achieve a sustainable return of inflation to the target.” Subsequently, growth was substantially stronger than expected through the remainder of 2016, mainly due to strong consumer spending, funded by increased borrowing. Now, many (including myself) thought the cut was a mistake at the time. But we all make mistakes. The Bank’s assessment of the impact on confidence appears to have been incorrect. Of course, some might argue that growth was stronger because the Bank eased policy, and no-one can prove that is wrong, but I think it is far-fetched. The fact is that the majority of the population (or at least half) are in favour of Brexit, so there is no good reason why the vote should have undermined consumer confidence. Business confidence might have been damaged in the longer run, but very few investment decisions are changed in a short time frame, so if there is a negative impact, it is yet to be felt. In practice, the relative resilience of spending may convince businesses to hold their nerve until the new trade arrangements become clearer, which may well take some time, as long as growth doesn’t start to slip back.

So it certainly seems as if the Bank of England made a policy error. While there is still very likely to be a longer term supply side shock from Brexit, that may not happen for quite some time, and the demand side shock the Bank initially expected has not materialised thus far. So what should they do? Should they reverse their easing and admit their error? The latest Inflation Report certainly shows inflation is expected to move above target soon and stay above target for the whole forecast horizon, which would suggest there is a pretty good prima facie case to raise rates or at least halt the increase in asset purchases. But the best way to fix an error is not always to simply reverse policy. Unless the reversal is done very quickly, the environment faced is different from the one faced initially. Things have changed.

In this case, the most notable change has been the decline in the pound. This has been good in some ways, as it has helped sustain manufacturing an export confidence in the face of uncertain future trade relationships, but it will lead to substantially higher inflation going forward, starting quite soon, as higher import prices feed through to CPI. It has also already led to higher inflation expectations. The key question as to whether this is sufficient reason to reverse the policy easing is whether the coming rise in inflation leads to an increase in wages and other factors generating domestically generated inflation. At this stage this is not clear, and is important. If wages don’t respond, we will see a sharp decline in real income growth as inflation rises, and if we also see a rise in rates from the Bank, there is a danger this will lead to a sharp decline in consumer confidence, potentially at the same time as sterling rises in response to a rise in rates. This could make the current optimism about the UK economy evaporate quite quickly.

So at this stage it seems sensible to wait. Inflation is coming, and it would be as well to see how this impacts spending and confidence before acting to reverse the move made in August. There has been a lot of British bravado since the Brexit vote, but high levels of debt and declining real incomes, plus the uncertainty surrounding the trade relationship with the EU and elsewhere, suggest that confidence is likely to be fragile. After making a policy mistake it is important not to compound it. The Bank mustn’t act looking in the rear view mirror.

 

 

EUR weighed down by GBP not Draghi

eurandgbp

Looking at the markets, it seems as if Draghi said that the ECB would be easing further come December, or at the very least March. The EUR has gone into a tailspin since the ECB meeting, and journalists are queuing up to blame Draghi. The trouble is, no-one seems quite sure what he said that triggered the move. One headline said “Euro close to 8-month lows vs dollar Friday after ECB chief Mario Draghi ruled out an abrupt end to QE.” Another headline “Euro wallows near March lows after Draghi quashes tapering talk”. So did he quash taper talk, or did he say the ECB would taper? Because if you don’t end abruptly, you taper (it’s one or the other). And which is better for the EUR? Because when it was suggested that the ECB would taper a month or so ago (by some unnamed committee member that Draghi emphasised had no insight) the EUR went up. So presumably if they don’t taper it goes down? Except Draghi said they would taper. Which I would have thought was sensible, and less likely to be EUR positive than an abrupt end to QE if anyone thought about it. Which all probably goes to show how silly the original “taper tantrum” was, but doesn’t really explain why the EUR has been so weak since Draghi’s press conference, especially since the effects of the initial taper tantrum were fairly short-lived in any case because on reflection most saw that the initial story didn’t mean a great deal, true or not.

In reality I don’t think the market really saw anything new in Draghi’s comments, but in the absence of anything new, the downtrend in EUR/USD remains in place. EUR/USD has been in a downtrend since the Brexit vote, and with the market expecting a Fed rate hike in December and currently seeing a probable Clinton victory as favourable (presumably because it is essentially the status quo – no nasty surprises), the burden of proof is now on those that want to oppose the EUR/USD downtrend. It is interesting that the Brexit situation appears to be the key factor that has pushed EUR/USD lower, though the UK is a small economy by comparison to the US and Eurozone giants. It is certainly the case that EUR/USD has never regained the 1.1377 high seen on June 24 and had been edging higher into the vote. It is hard to see that the economic news form the two economies since then has been particularly USD positive or EUR negative. If anything the opposite is true. Certainly since the beginning of this year the performance of the Eurozone in both growth and inflation has been broadly in line with expectations, while US growth has significantly underperformed. In fact, the OECD currently expect US GDP growth to be weaker than the Eurozone’s this year, and although many expect the Fed to raise rates in December, this is significantly less tightening than had been anticipated  at the start of the year.

So we need some change in market perceptions for the EUR to stop falling, at least until we reach the key levels in the 1.05-1.08 area in EUR/USD. A less negative view of Brexit from the perspective of both the UK and the Eurozone is the most obvious potential trigger, though that doesn’t seem imminent with the EU ruling out negotiation until the UK invokes Article 50, which most likely will be in Q1 2017. The other main possibility is a change in the perception of the Fed, though the way things have turned out this year suggests that even if the Fed don’t raise rates in December, the hit to USD strength may only be temporary unless the ECB turn out to be unexpectedly hawkish at their December meeting. The third chance of a Trump victory is one I hope we don’t have to consider.

GBP weakness overdone?

Well, yes and no. I think the lows seen overnight represent a reasonable idea of the base for GBP, but we may well have another look at them before we go higher. I would argue that while the bad news about Brexit is now broadly in the market, there are few reasons to buy GBP, and levels are still not that attractive, so I would still prefer the downside for now.

The overnight moves were clearly exacerbated by poor liquidity in Asian hours, though it’s still surprising to me that liquidity is that poor. It seems that in the new algo dominated world such moves are becoming more frequent, though it is more surprising in GBP than it was in the CHF when there was a clear change in regime in the removal of a floor. Exotic options structures may have been responsible, but I am not totally convinced by the explanations I have heard.

Anyway, GBP has bounced back after the sharp dip overnight, but buyers will now be even more wary than they were and the prospects of recovery consequently that much less. Was the weakness overnight justified by events? No, in that nothing changed dramatically enough to trigger such a sharp fall. Underlying concern about a “hard” Brexit is behind the negative GBP sentiment, but does this mean GBP is weak indefinitely until the reality of the trade arrangements are realised? Surely not, as we may see no clarity for years. What we are seeing from May, Hollande, Juncker, Merkel et al. isn’t even negotiation yet. The UK hasn’t even triggered Article 50. This is just the pre-negotiation posturing – the trash talk before the big fight. I don’t know what the trade relations between the UK and the EU will look like in the end, but I suspect there won’t be the radical step change in trade that some seem to think. The bad news of a “hard” Brexit is now essentially in the market, so may be there is no more to come and GBP has hit its lows. This is certainly possible, but the problem is that the pound still isn’t particularly cheap.

There is more than one way of assessing value in FX, but I will show three charts here to illustrate why I think GBP is far from being significantly cheap. It is broadly fair against the USD, but it is still expensive against the EUR. I have published these before back in June before the Brexit vote as reasons why, even if there had been a vote to Remain, GBP was too high.

The first chart underlines that GBP is still well above PPP against the EUR. While currencies don’t necessarily trade near PPP, it is a good starting point, and it can be seen from the chart that GBP has generally traded a lot closer to PPP against the EUR than it did in recent years. There was some justification for higher GBP valuation at the height of the EUR crisis, including higher UK yields and greater perceived security, but the yield advantage has effectively vanished and GBP now also looks more risky and less secure, so the justification for trading above PPP is much reduced.

Against the USD the tendency until the mid noughties was to trade close to PPP. Subsequent GBP strength may have been a result of reserve diversification by major central banks (among other things) but current PPP is around 1.32, so we are only marginally below there.

The third chart illustrates how major currency levels versus PPP generally correlate to the size of the current account deficit/surplus in each currency. On this basis GBP looks about fair, while the EUR looks very obviously cheap and the CHF exceptionally expensive. The relatively high valuation of the NZD and AUD reflect their higher yields. The cheapness of the EUR and the high level of the CHF suggests the CHF is the proxy DEM, but sooner or later I expect this will also be corrected.

eurgbppppoctober16

Source: OECD, FX Economics

gbpusdpppoctober16

Source: OECD, FX Economics

fxvalueoctober16

Source: OECD, FX Economics

 

 

 

 

Carney, Prince of pessimism

hamlet

“There is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so”. Hamlet

The most striking thing to me about yesterday’s raft of information and decisions from the Bank of England was the willingness to act on the basis of forecasts of significant near term economic weakness based on, let’s face it, remarkably little solid evidence. This has continued the trend of the Bank supporting the view that the Brexit vote is a disaster and will lead to a major economic slowdown, a view that is becoming self-perpetuating.

Now, of course, the Bank of England has to try to act on the basis of forecasts, and if it merely responds to coincident or lagging indicators of the economy it risks being seen to be “behind the curve” or setting policy “looking in the rear view mirror”. But we are in a unique situation here. No-one has ever left the EU before. We don’t know what the UK trade arrangements will be in the future, and these will in any case not be in place for more than another two years. The Bank takes the view that the ultimate result will be some reduction in UK supply capacity in 2019 and beyond, though it admits the extent of this effect is very uncertain. Fair enough. But the measures announced yesterday were not really intended to deal with this, but with the short-term demand reaction. It is here that I think the Bank is on very shaky ground, for several reasons.

First of all, we should need no reminding that the Bank’s record of forecasting under Carney has been woeful, from the initial unexpectedly sharp decline in unemployment which quickly left his conditions for raising rates looking ridiculous, to the more recent indications that rates were likely to go up rather than down. Carney’s reputation as an “unreliable boyfriend” is therefore to some extent justified, though I would argue his fault is not so much a lack of foresight – as all forecasters know, being wrong is the norm – as suggesting he has more confidence in his foresight and consequently his understanding of the correct policy path than he had any real right to. Of course, there are uncertainty bands around all the Bank of England Inflation report forecasts, but Carney has always tried to provide an impression of greater commitment to a view than these suggest, in contrast to his predecessor Lord King, who increasingly emphasised that neither he nor anyone else knew the answers to many of the questions he was asked.

So it would be foolish to take the Bank’s forecasts as gospel, even in normal times, and one of the main points made by the Bank yesterday was that these were more uncertain times than usual and that there had been “sharp rises in indicators of uncertainty in recent months”. Once again, fair enough, But the Bank goes on to conclude that such uncertainty could lead to a reduction in spending, particularly major spending commitments. Well, maybe, but maybe not. The impact of uncertainty is very – er – uncertain. Uncertainty squared, if you like.

Of course, as former MPC member Charles Goodhart has noted, we always think the situation is uncertain, and this is not an excuse for doing nothing. That only leads to vacillation. The Bank has taken a view that further monetary accommodation is needed because the risks are on the downside. Again, as Goodhart has pointed out, the impact of these measures is unlikely to be very large, as monetary policy has close to run out of bullets, but they are unlikely to do any harm, at least directly.

So my problem is not with the measures per se, or even the broad slant of the analysis, but with the presentation.  The Bank accepts that there is a lot of uncertainty, and worries that this will lead to less spending. But the reaction of people and businesses is not set in stone. It is about confidence and sentiment. The Bank’s policy reaction is not so much about the actual shape of the trade relations in years to come, but the reaction of firms and consumers to worrying about it. The best way of dealing with this is not to say – “yes, things are pretty awful, so here are some measures that might be a bit of a help if things turn out to be as bad as we fear”. It is to take as positive approach as possible, say that we don’t really know what is going to happen down the road, but there is no real need to change our behaviour now as the picture in two or three years time is really entirely unknown. Brexit may not even be the most important thing that happens over that period. For instance, if the Eurozone’s nascent recovery continues, helped by some expansionary fiscal policy, it may swamp any negative Brexit impact (if there is any).

Now, there is of course some need for transparency, and Carney has taken the view that it was the responsibility of the Bank to put out its best guess of the impact of Brexit ahead of the vote. But I feel this was the first error that has been compounded by subsequent acts. You don’t have to believe, like some on the Treasury Select Committee, that there was a sinister political motive behind the Bank’s negative forecasts ahead of the vote, to think that a more humble view would have been far less damaging. If the Bank had merely said that the impact was uncertain and it would react when there was some greater clarity, the idea that a big slowdown was inevitable would not have become so ingrained, and firms and consumers would be less inclined to believe they should put off big spending projects. The latest Bank action might still have been the same, but could have been presented as an insurance policy rather than a reaction to an inevitable sharp downturn. Now we are in danger of talking ourselves into a downturn, and producing a fiscal expansion we can ill afford to offset it.

Perhaps Carney should have spent more time reading Shakespeare rather than learning about DSGE models. Then he would know that “there is nothing good or bad but thinking makes it so”.

The value is in EUR

The short term focus in FX has been on central banks. The lack of BoJ action,  diminishing expectations of action from the Fed, and the ECB approaching the limits of easing have all contributed to a strong JPY and EUR and weaker USD, while today saw the RBA sucked into the anti-deflation battle once again, halting the AUD recovery. The rationale for focusing so much on minor changes in central bank policy seems to me to be very flawed, and the scale of the reactions on the face of it looks excessive. But what appears to be excessive volatility in reaction to minor news may in fact be something else. It may be a reflection of very out of line initial valuations. As the market’s love of the USD and the story of widening yield spreads fades, recent sharp moves may reflect a realisation that valuations may be a long way out of line if the focus is changing. This is important for anyone looking beyond the short term, and even short term traders should be aware that with the long term USD uptrend under threat, the dominant paradigm may be shifting.

The simplest way of looking at value in FX is to consider real trade-weighted indices. These provide a comparison of the real value of currencies over time. I have put together a chart using BIS data rebased to February 1987 – the data of the Louvre accord when the major countries tried to stabilise currencies. This is not necessarily representative of fair value for reasons I will elaborate on later, but is a reasonable place to start. On this basis, the JPY looks the cheapest of the major currencies, and the Swiss franc the most expensive. The USD went from cheap in 2013 to expensive by the end of 2014 and extended its valuation though 2015. GBP also looks expensive on this basis, albeit a little less so than it was, while the EUR is on the cheap side.

realeffectives

But valuation on this basis misses out two key factors. First, the possibility of structural change and second the cyclical movements in currencies that result from movements in yield spreads. Of course, the latter is by its nature a temporary phenomenon, and cyclical movements in currencies always looks excessively volatile based on yield spreads. The increased attraction of higher yields makes a currency more attractive, but currency moves typically substantially overcompensate for the increased expected return. This is why a change in market sentiment can conversely produce an apparently excessive reaction in the opposite direction, as in the recent move in the JPY.

However, structural changes can and should have a sustained impact on currency valuations. I tend to look at this in terms of movements in the current account. Currencies with big current account surpluses tend to be more highly valued than those with a deficit, as a current account surplus represents a persistent flow into the currency which needs to be offset by capital flows in the opposite direction, encouraged by a higher currency. Changes in the terms of trade are one major factor that can change the structural current account position, but other factors can also have an impact.

In the current situation, the most notable current account changes in recent years have been the rise in the Eurozone current account surplus, the rise in the UK deficit, and the decline, and more recently recovery, in the Japanese surplus. These are important changes, because the history of the real exchange rate index has to be coloured by such structural changes. So the weakness in the JPY we have seen until recently was in part justified by the deterioration in the Japanese current account position. However, the recent improvement suggests some scope for the JPY to recover, especially since the weakness had in any case overshot somewhat. Meanwhile, the big rise in the Eurozone current account surplus justifies a stronger EUR valuation, and the converse is true for the UK.

Now, movements in the current account are also cyclical, with stronger growth economies typically having bigger deficits, and cyclically improving current account positions are not normally positive for a currency, because they are usually accompanied by independent capital outflows towards higher growth economies, usually because of higher or rising yields. But when the relative growth underperformance stops, the surplus doesn’t quickly disappear, and the surplus may become the dominant factor. This is the situation now in the Eurozone. The EUR not only looks cheap on valuation, it is even cheaper when the recent current account improvement is taken into account, and currently the Eurozone is also actually growing faster than the US or the UK (at least in Q1 2016). So something of a perfect storm for the EUR.

As for the JPY, while it looks the cheapest currency compared to history, it is probably less cheap than the EUR when the recent structural changes are taken into account. This is illustrated in the chart below.

 

valuemodel

So in the longer term I would see plenty of further upside for the EUR. However, in the short to medium term, the USD and GBP could recover if relatively strong US and UK growth returns and yield spreads resume the widening trend. Nevertheless, while his could happen in the next few quarters, I see little scope for this to continue longer term as cyclically adjusted budget positions in the US, and particularly the UK, need to be reined in. In comparison, the Eurozone has potential to expand budgets being that much further below trend output and full employment.

 

GBP – History repeating.

It’s all just a little bit of history repeating” The Propellerheads

“We learn from history that we do not learn from history.” Hegel

“The history book on the shelf is always repeating itself” ABBA

Instinctively, I tend to assume the human race has made progress over the last 100 years and our understanding of most things has increased dramatically. Technology has advanced enormously and clearly one thing that has changed in financial markets is the ability to access liquidity in all manner of financial instruments. But has the understanding of what drives financial markets and what is the appropriate valuation for markets improved?  I would like to say yes, but my experience tells me that the answer is no. Technology has vastly increased the amount of information available to market participants, but the understanding of the importance of various different pieces of information seems no better than it was in 1929, 1974, 2000, 2008 or times in between. In fact, the huge increase in the amount of information available may only serve to obfuscate the information of real importance, as markets react to red headlines and systematic asset managers are programmed to react in the same way as in the past or to follow the crowd. An increase in the volume of information only reduces the impact of the information that is of real importance if the market assigns some importance to every piece of information. Or in other words, the more information there is the more possible reasons there are to justify any given market valuation. Thus, the 2000 dotcom bubble found a reason for a wildly out of line valuation, and there were enough greedy investors and trend followers to send equity markets to stratospherically silly levels.

So much for philosophy. What’s the relevance to today’s markets? I wrote recently about the low valuation of European equities (see “A huge opportunity”), and I stick by that view. Some have come back to me worrying about low European growth, Italian banks, Cocos, European immigration, populist movements, but this seems to me to miss the point. There are always risks and concerns, but they have to be evaluated relative to the things that matter for value – in the case of equities this means growth prospects, the initial level of  earnings and dividends, alternative investments (interest rates), and risk premia, which is a bit of a catch all and can be used to justify almost anything, but a sensible view tells me that risks now are less serious than they were at the height of the Greek crisis.

For currencies the metrics are different, and although most of the time the markets are dominated by risk on/risk off trades, it makes little sense to think of currencies moving in this way over the long run. Real currency levels are ultimately anchored to fairly static long run valuation measures, unlike equities which rise over time with nominal growth. Relative growth rates can certainly matter for currencies, not least because they affect relative interest rates, but in the developed world there is actually relatively little long term divergence in growth rates, especially when adjusted for population growth. This isn’t really that surprising, as in the developed world technology and capital is very mobile, and it is hard for one country to show a sustained superior growth performance. Most of the time, better growth is temporary, and comes with a price, usually a bigger current account deficit, as is currently clear in the UK. Changes in the terms of trade – as can be seen with the big move in the oil price – will of course have a long term impact, but I distrust debt fuelled growth (and any growth that is generating an unsustainable current account deficit is debt fuelled from a whole country perspective) as long run reason for currency strength. Sooner or later (admittedly usually later) the positive currency impact of stronger growth and higher rates is reversed either by the need to rein back on growth to control the current account or inflation or the budget, or by others catching up.

What does this have to do with history repeating for GBP? Well it’s a roundabout way of saying that the strong pound, the growing UK current account deficit (and indeed twin UK deficits) are a repeat of a long history of similar episodes in post war UK economic history. The strength of the pound won’t last and we are headed for either a slow or a fast decline in the pound, depending on whether the UK stays in the EU (staying will hold GBP up) and whether the world economy picks up (if it does the decline in GBP will be slower). But the period of UK and GBP outperformance is hitting traditional current account buffers. Sure, UK won’t have to go cap in hand to the IMF this time as in 1976, and a fading of Brexit fears may trigger a GBP rally of sorts. But whatever the politicians agree, the risk of a vote to leave will remain, and more importantly, the underlying economics doesn’t justify a stronger pound, or even as strong a pound as we have now in the longer run. With even McCafferty accepting that UK rates aren’t going up, EUR/GBP is a buy on the dip, even if the ECB cut again as is widely expected and add to QE. Look for 0.85 this year in EUR/GBP, possibly 0.95 if things go badly on Brexit.

 

EUR/GBP rally – if not now, when?

After flirting with the 0.75 area for a few days, EUR/GBP has pushed through on this morning’s weak industrial production data and has potential to start making real ground to the upside. Technically, there are some reasons for caution. Although last week saw a strong weekly close at the highest level for a year, we have had seven consecutive up weeks and the weekly channel top at 0.7525 hasn’t broken convincingly. But, if not now, when?

GBP has been overvalued for a long time, most particularly against the EUR, it’s largest trading partner. It is also a lot more overvalued than it looks, for two reasons. Firstly, because UK inflation has been much higher than inflation in other major economies since the financial crisis. While inflation has recently been subdued, CPI in the UK has risen 10% more than CPI in the US or the Eurozone since 2008. So 0.75 now is equivalent to 0.68 in 2008 in real terms. Secondly, the UK is running a current account deficit of 6% of GDP – the largest in the developed world – while the Eurozone is running a surplus of 3% of GDP. While the UK deficit has come about mainly because of declining UK investment income rather than a rising trade deficit, it won’t be closed by improved export performance at this level of GBP. Historically, current account positions DO matter for valuation over the long run, and the widening of the UK deficit suggests to us that long run fair value for EUR/GBP is more like 0.85 or 0.90 than 0.75.

But this has been the case for some time Why should GBP suffer now?

  1. The long awaited UK rate hike still seems to be disappearing into the distance as wage growth stalls, so those looking to buy GBP on yield spread grounds have little support in the short run.
  2. GBP has already fallen a long way against the USD, and while it may fall further, yield spreads between the US and Europe have also stalled or narrowed of late as US data has slightly disappointed since the Fed rate hike, so there seems limited downside for EUR/USD from here in the short run, suggesting at least as much GBP downside potential against the EUR
  3. The EU referendum question. The possibility of Brexit is clearly negative for GBP and while I personally think there will be a strong majority in favour of staying in the EU, the foreign investment that the UK needs to funds its current account deficit is unlikely to be too enthusiastic while the question is in the air.
  4. Policy wise, there is nothing the government or the Bank of England would like more than a weaker pound. They will never try to force it, but I wouldn’t be surprised to see a little verbal encouragement of GBP weakness.
  5. A weak oil price is more supportive for the Eurozone than the UK, given the Eurozone is a much bigger net oil importer.

By the time we get to the referendum (maybe June) I expect we will already have seen the big decline in GBP, and we may see a recovery after the referendum if, as I expect, we get a vote to stay in. The recovery may start before the referendum if it looks like the “remain” campaign is going to win easily. There is no time like the present for the GBP bears to get the ball rolling.

 

CHF and GBP vulnerable

So we start the new Year with another bout of risk aversion, rooted it seems mostly in China, though the US numbers have also not been great. But today’s European PMI data was fine, and Sweden’s was certainly good. The market is a bit overobsessed with China in my view, especially since we can’t really trust the data. In any case, if China is a problem for growth in the developed world it should be showing up in domestic  data. So I like buying the European equity indices on this dip, and don’t see general risk aversion lasting.

From an FX perspective, the implications of risk aversion are less clear than they used to be. Yes the JPY has strengthened, but the CHF is still weak, especially against the EUR, and this may be a signal that the CHF is going to suffer this year. EUR/CHF has had every chance to go back below 1.07 but hasn’t managed it, and has surged lower over the New Year. With heavily negative yields and still very expensive valuation, there is little to recommend it except in extreme risk aversion when money may once again stop flowing out of CHF. For now, the CHF should be a core short.

The other currency which looks likely to be something of a focus early this year is GBP. Some are noting that the GBP sell off looks a bit overdone because yield spreads don’t suggest it should be this low. But even if you disregard all the concerns related to the potential EU referendum, the case for buying GBP on the basis of yield spreads is pretty weak. The big UK current account deficit and the relatively high UK inflation since 2008 (about 10% more than the US or Eurozone) mean GBP already looks very expensive. In fact, it’s just as expensive as the CHF in my models. So expect GBP to stay under pressure at least until the data shows a case for an early rate hike of the EU worries fade. I doubt either of these will happen before February at the earliest.

Sterling – is the good news in?

The next few months up to the UK election offer significant downside risks for GBP, especially against the EUR and JPY.

Sterling has benefitted over the last couple of years from the UK’s relatively strong growth performance even though this has yet to deliver a rate hike or even a real near term expectation of one. To be honest, I think the Bank should have hiked rates already – the excuse that inflation is currently low doesn’t really wash, as on the 2-3 year horizon the current weakness of inflation will lead to higher inflation assuming the oil price stabilises or rises from here. Stronger demand due to the current low oil price will help boost growth, wages and inflation going forward, and should provide a good case for higher rates after the election.

But while I think the Bank should have raised rates already, the fact is they haven’t, and are very unlikely to move this side of the election. So until after the election, most of the good news does seem to be in, and abstracting from the run up to the Scotland referendum, there may be some severe electoral downside risks that could take hold quite quickly even if the risks appear to be well known.

The polls are unclear, but a Labour/SNP coalition certainly looks a very possible outcome. I suspect this is not something the market would greet with open arms. The concern is that a focus on taxation of the wealthy could undermine capital inflows into the UK, and even if this were only temporary, it’s a dangerous prospect for the  country with the biggest current account deficit (as % of GDP) of all the majors.

Now, the pound is very strong against the EUR and the JPY, so these are the currencies against which it may be most vulnerable. The EUR in particular is at levels which are equivalent to sub-0.70 pre-crisis in real terms given the high UK inflation rates in the meantime. The risk premium in the EUR certainly looks justified given the Greek uncertainties, but may diminish on a temporary deal and both the Eurozone and Japanese economies will benefit even more from the decline in the oil price than the UK.

It may well be that UK rates do rise earlier than the market currently expects, in which case there may be a sterling buying opportunity after the election. The trouble is that the factors that make sterling attractive are also the seeds of its destruction, because relatively strong UK growth has created the big current account deficit. This may not prevent another sterling rally, but I think it will have to come from lower levels. Right now, the risks are on the downside, and I like selling GBP/JPY to avoid too much commitment to the Eurozone recovery story. Look for a dip sub-170, with 188 a good stop area.