Trade ideas for 2017

sp-vs-eurostoxx50

  1. Long Euro Stoxx 50 – Entry 3280, target 4000, stop 2870.

European equities are just too cheap. The Euro Stoxx 50 has massively underperformed the S&P 500 since the financial crisis. Part of this is of course because the Eurozone economy has underperformed the US. But the scale of US outperformance is excessive. US nominal GDP has risen 24% since 2008. Eurozone GDP has only risen 10%. But the S&P 500 has risen 45% since the 2008 high, while the Euro Stoxx 50 is still 28% below its 2008 high. Of course, part of the strength of the S&P is due to easy monetary policy – US 10 year yields are, even with the recent rise, around 1.5% below where they were pre-crisis. However, this is even more of a case for Euro Stoxx strength. Bund yields are more than 4% below pre-crisis levels, and while peripheral yields have fallen less than bund yields, most have fallen more than the US 10 year.

With Euro Stoxx down 28% from 2008 highs and long-term yields down around 3% or more, the risk premium has increased enormously. Now, many will point to all sorts of risks to justify this. French, German, Dutch and maybe Italian elections next year. Greece still an issue. Brexit.  But if the US can welcome Trump with higher equities, a European political shift to the right won’t necessarily be bad for stocks. European growth appears to be improving slowly, and European yields are set to stay a lot lower than the US. Plus the above calculations don’t take account of the 35% decline in the Euro since 2008. Currency adjusted, the underperformance of  European equities is even more dramatic.

Of course, it may be that higher US yields lead to a US equity decline, so perhaps some of this should be taken relative to the US. But if US yields rise because of stronger growth and inflation under Trumponomics, it will benefit European growth as well, and will probably not mean a drastic decline in US equities, making European equities all the more attractive.

2. Long USD/CHF – Entry 1.03, target 1.20, stop 0.95.

There is also a case for long EUR/CHF but it makes sense to be long USD on the basis that even after the latest change in the Fed outlook the market is still pricing quite a moderate US rate profile through 2017. An aggressive Trump spending programme could lead to still more spread widening in favour of the USD.

Even so, I find it hard to sell EUR/USD looking for moves below parity. It does look likely to happen, but long-term the EUR will be good value at those levels assuming the Eurozone disaster scenarios don’t play out, so I look for a trade that is better value. The CHF remains the world’s most overvalued currency, and continues benefit from general distrust of the EUR. But if Italian banks don’t go under and growth continues to steadily improve helped by further US fiscal expansion, the case for holding CHF against the EUR looks weak, with the EUR likely to benefit against the CHF from improving equity market confidence (see above). Negative Swiss interest rates will become even more of a disincentive to hold CHF if other assets are becoming more attractive.

In disaster scenarios, the SNB is likely to ensure the CHF benefits less than the USD.

3. Short GBP/SEK – Entry 11. 50, target 9.50,  stop 12.25.

This was to some extent the trade of 2016, but I think it has further to run given that it has had a sharp correction higher since sterling’s “flash crash” on October 7th. The Swedish economy continues to show the strongest growth in Europe, and although the Riksbank remains highly focused on inflation and will consequently not be tightening policy anytime soon, the Riksbank is nevertheless likely to tighten before the ECB and before the Bank of England, as growth in the UK looks likely to be restricted by rising inflation and consequently weak real incomes and consumption.

Brexit is more of a swing factor than a pure negative for GBP, but it seems unlikely that the UK will achieve any real clarity ahead of the major European elections this year, while concerns may build about another Scottish referendum. The risks consequently see to be more on the GBP downside in the short term.

Although the SEK has gained against GBP in 2016, it has been generally weak against other currencies, and despite the UK’s Brexit issues and massive current account deficit, GBP/SEK is only in the middle of its range seen since the financial crisis. Furthermore this doesn’t take into account GBP’s real appreciation due to relatively high UK inflation over the period, which means that in real terms GBP/SEK is nearer the bottom than the top of its post crisis range. Rising UK inflation will be creating more real GBP appreciation going forward, further supporting the case for nominal SEK gains.

 

Disclaimer: These are my ideas and I believe them to be well founded. However, they could easily go wrong. All trades are taken at your own risk. I take no responsibility for losses (and no claim on profits) made due to following these ideas. 

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