A crisis for UK democracy?

power-of-the-press-5-638

A bit on the markets in a minute, but first a bit of a rant.

If the Daily Mail call High Court judges “enemies of the people” simply for saying that parliament has to sanction the triggering of Article 50, what will it do if some MPs choose to vote against the wishes of their constituents?

This is a difficult issue for some MPs. After all, some are in constituencies that voted to Remain but themselves support Brexit. Others are in Leave constituencies but were in favour of Remaining. The Daily Mail would argue that the people have spoken with the referendum, but the result was close, and had more young people voted might have gone the other way. It might go the other way if it was done again today. So in my view MPs should vote in line with their own views. But they won’t. Even if they are in “Remain” constituencies, and are pro-Remain themselves, very few MPs will vote down a bill to trigger Article 50. Partly because they will be put on the front page of the Daily Mail if they do. And they remember what happened to Jo Cox. This is not a good way to govern a country, and reminiscent of some unpleasant regimes.

Unless MPs are prepared to act as responsible human beings and stand up to their party, the press and the noisy section of their constituents, they are becoming an irrelevance. They are mere ciphers. They are not being allowed to make their own decisions about anything important. It is important to have a role for personal conscience.

The further irony is that Brexit was (according to the Leave camp anyway) supposed to be about taking back control of our government from the EU. But if MPs are effectively just servants of the government, we are effectively being governed by royal prerogative. Come back Oliver Cromwell.

Anyway, rant over. The markets.

Sterling has managed a little rally in response to the High Court decision that parliament has to trigger Article 50, but this doesn’t look like it will be enough to sustain a strong rally in GBP for at least two reasons.

1) Although GBP is now a lot cheaper than it was, it is not dramatically cheap against the USD or the EUR given the big UK current account deficit and the lack of (real) yield attraction available in GBP.

2) Even if the High Court decision is upheld by the Supreme Court, it doesn’t mean no Brexit. Brexit is still extremely likely to happen. There might be some impact on the shape of the Brexit, but even this isn’t clear. If the government sticks to its guns on rejecting free movement and the EU sticks to its guns on making free movement a condition for single market access, it seems doubtful that parliament will really be able to have much real effect. What does seem likely (though not certain) is that there will be a significant delay in triggering Article 50 because of the time it is likely to take to put a bill through the Commons and Lords (average time one year). There could be a simple resolution to speed things along, but this would mean parliament would have to have its say at a later date.

So the vote has created extra uncertainty around Brexit, and has perhaps increased the chances of a softer version and a longer delay. This is mildly supportive for GBP, but some argue that the delay and uncertainty only makes things worse as firms are unable to plan for the future. I’d say this is outweighed by the increased chance of a softer Brexit, but not so much as to justify a dramatic GBP rally. EUR/GBP may manage to get back to the 0.86 area, but unless there is a lot more promise of a soft Brexit or some evidence on Eurozone weakness and/or UK strength gains beyond this are hard to justify. Still, it looks like it might be enough to stabilise GBP in the 0.86-0.91 range.

I have put this in terms of EUR/GBP rather than GBP/USD because coming into the US election the picture for the USD is obviously very uncertain. Most take the view that a Clinton victory will be USD positive, and market behaviour in the run up to the election suggests this is the case, but with a Clinton victory now priced as around an 80% chance, the market reaction may not be huge. The Fed is very likely to hike if markets respond positively – even neutrally – to the election, and that should be enough to sustain the USD against most currencies, though which currencies it gains most against will to some extent depend on the (uncertain) medium term equity market reaction to the combination of a Clinton win and higher US rates.

This is all pretty much the consensus view, and I’m not going to speculate too much on what happens if Trump wins, except to say that I’m not sure the impact will be that sustained. In the end, Washington will put fairly substantial limits on what he is able to do.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s