GBP weakness overdone?

Well, yes and no. I think the lows seen overnight represent a reasonable idea of the base for GBP, but we may well have another look at them before we go higher. I would argue that while the bad news about Brexit is now broadly in the market, there are few reasons to buy GBP, and levels are still not that attractive, so I would still prefer the downside for now.

The overnight moves were clearly exacerbated by poor liquidity in Asian hours, though it’s still surprising to me that liquidity is that poor. It seems that in the new algo dominated world such moves are becoming more frequent, though it is more surprising in GBP than it was in the CHF when there was a clear change in regime in the removal of a floor. Exotic options structures may have been responsible, but I am not totally convinced by the explanations I have heard.

Anyway, GBP has bounced back after the sharp dip overnight, but buyers will now be even more wary than they were and the prospects of recovery consequently that much less. Was the weakness overnight justified by events? No, in that nothing changed dramatically enough to trigger such a sharp fall. Underlying concern about a “hard” Brexit is behind the negative GBP sentiment, but does this mean GBP is weak indefinitely until the reality of the trade arrangements are realised? Surely not, as we may see no clarity for years. What we are seeing from May, Hollande, Juncker, Merkel et al. isn’t even negotiation yet. The UK hasn’t even triggered Article 50. This is just the pre-negotiation posturing – the trash talk before the big fight. I don’t know what the trade relations between the UK and the EU will look like in the end, but I suspect there won’t be the radical step change in trade that some seem to think. The bad news of a “hard” Brexit is now essentially in the market, so may be there is no more to come and GBP has hit its lows. This is certainly possible, but the problem is that the pound still isn’t particularly cheap.

There is more than one way of assessing value in FX, but I will show three charts here to illustrate why I think GBP is far from being significantly cheap. It is broadly fair against the USD, but it is still expensive against the EUR. I have published these before back in June before the Brexit vote as reasons why, even if there had been a vote to Remain, GBP was too high.

The first chart underlines that GBP is still well above PPP against the EUR. While currencies don’t necessarily trade near PPP, it is a good starting point, and it can be seen from the chart that GBP has generally traded a lot closer to PPP against the EUR than it did in recent years. There was some justification for higher GBP valuation at the height of the EUR crisis, including higher UK yields and greater perceived security, but the yield advantage has effectively vanished and GBP now also looks more risky and less secure, so the justification for trading above PPP is much reduced.

Against the USD the tendency until the mid noughties was to trade close to PPP. Subsequent GBP strength may have been a result of reserve diversification by major central banks (among other things) but current PPP is around 1.32, so we are only marginally below there.

The third chart illustrates how major currency levels versus PPP generally correlate to the size of the current account deficit/surplus in each currency. On this basis GBP looks about fair, while the EUR looks very obviously cheap and the CHF exceptionally expensive. The relatively high valuation of the NZD and AUD reflect their higher yields. The cheapness of the EUR and the high level of the CHF suggests the CHF is the proxy DEM, but sooner or later I expect this will also be corrected.

eurgbppppoctober16

Source: OECD, FX Economics

gbpusdpppoctober16

Source: OECD, FX Economics

fxvalueoctober16

Source: OECD, FX Economics

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s