Short term risk recovery

blues

“It’s dark, and we’re wearing sunglasses”. The Blues Brothers

So we’re in a bit of limbo Brexit-wise. We don’t know when it will happen (some say even if it will happen), what trade deals will be done, who will be allowed to stay in the UK when we leave, how the elections elsewhere will go, and so on. Still, it is reasonable to say it will have some negative impact on the economy on the short-term. Increased uncertainty will reduce investment by at least a few firms, though it may only be delayed if we finish up with a comparatively benign outcome. I am less sure there will be any direct impact on consumer spending, but the decline in GBP will raise prices and reduce real incomes and spending as a result. Conversely, the impact of a weaker pound on exports may be positive eventually, but not in the short run and perhaps never. While UK exports will be cheaper, it takes time for new orders to be found, and the pound still isn’t cheap enough for the UK to compete in most areas. Plus exports to the EU may suffer because of the lack of any detail on the future relationship. All this is broadly known and in the price, but the extent of the economic impact is very uncertain.

We won’t get any post referendum data until August, and it may be that it is hard to see a clear impact for a few months even if there is a slowdown. So we’re driving if not blind, then at least in the dark with sunglasses on (like the Blues Brothers).

The Bank of England needs to decide this week whether these conditions justify some new action. They have already eased capital requirements on the banks but many think this is just a preamble to a rate cut, as bank profitability will now be partially protected. Carney has said he believes some monetary easing is justified. Many think a rate cut will be delayed until August, but we will know very little more in August than we do now. So I expect the Bank will cut rates this week, though other measures are also possible. It probably doesn’t matter too much exactly what the measures are, as in reality the issue is building confidence rather than adjusting the cost of borrowing.

What will be the impact on the FX markets? If there is no action risk will suffer and with it the pound as well as the other “risky” currencies. If there is a cut an initial dip in the pound may well prove a buying opportunity as risk recovers. The Bank knows that something is expected and is unlikely to take the risk of doing nothing because of the probable negative impact on markets of what would be perceived as dithering. Carney has effectively forced the hand of the rest of the Monetary Policy Committee by saying action is necessary. So look for a bold Bank and a risk positive reaction, especially since the global background is better after the better US employment numbers and the withdrawal of the ludicrous Leadsom as candidate for PM. EUR/JPY (or probably better still, SEK/JPY) seem the cheapest major currency pairs to me. Of course, it may not last if the economic impact of the Brexit vote turns out to be very negative, or if the negotiations between the UK and Juncker and co. break up in acrimony. But for now, while the outcomes are unclear, expect a risk recovery as the Bank tries to build confidence.

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